Spectralcat's Blog

July 1, 2009

Part II: Liberating the Asus 1000HE: Preparing for Linux

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , — spectralcat @ 7:36 am

Setting up XP:

First I spent some time trying to turn Microsoft XP into a useable operating system. Since I was going to keep this shit, I wanted it to work. So after connecting Windows to the Internet, I immediately installed and configured the following programs: Firefox and the adblock plus and noscript extensions, AVG Virus Scanner (free), and Spybot S&D Spyware Remover

I then cleared all the useless windows garbage off the desktop: right-click, properties: desktop: customize: clean desktop now.

Preparing for installing Linux:

I started by downloading the Eeebuntu Standard edition installation ISO. (The 1000HE has a large enough screen that it doesn’t really need the netbook remix version.) I used bittorrent to take care of this download, but it’s easy enough to download the ISO directly from Eeebuntu’s website. (If you download the ISO directly, just make sure you calculate the MD5 of the completed ISO download by using a program like digestIT.

and compare it to the MD5 listed on Eeebuntu’s webpage. Do this by installing the 32 bit version of digestIT, right-clicking on the completed eeebuntu .iso file (eeebuntu-3.0-standard.iso) and selecting digest It-2004: “calculate md5 Hash.” If the MD5 numbers don’t match, your download was corrupted and you’ll need to re-download the ISO file.)

Next, I had to install the ISO file in a bootable form on a 1 gig usb stick. To do this, I downloaded Unetbootin which is a program that turns an ordinary usb stick into a bootable usb stick. I first backed up all the important files from my usbstick. Then I pluged it into the EEE and used Windows XP to format it as a FAT32 file system: Select “My Computer”: right-click on the removable usb stick; select “Format”: select FAT32 . I then started up Unetbootin and had it install the eeebuntu ISO file onto my newly formatted usb stick as follows: select “discimage”: leave ISO checked: locate eeebuntu-3.0-standard.iso: under “Type” make sure the removable disc is selected (it will probably be drive E): select OK.

Next, I prepared Windows to be smashed around and shrunken. I deleted all of the unnecessary files, emptied the trashcan, and error-checked and defragmented the C: and D: drives. (The 1000HE oddly comes with two Windows partitions: the C and D drives which are each around 72 gigs.) To error check and defragment the C and D drives: Go to My Computer and then right-click on the C drive, select Properties: select “disk cleanup”: then go to “tools”: “Defragment Now”: select Analyze: then select “error checking” and select “automatically fix errors” and “scan for bad sectors”: restart the computer as required: once the error checking is done, then go back to properties: tools: and select Defragment.

Error checking the C drive requires the computer to be restart.

Error checking the C drive requires the computer to be restart.

Repeat this process with the D drive (running an error-correction on the D drive will not force you to restart the computer, though).

Error checking the D drive.  Do not skip this step.

Error checking the D drive. Do not skip this step.

The C and D drives after defragmentation.

The C and D drives after defragmentation.

Now we enter the bios program and set the computer up to boot from the usb stick as follows: Turn off the computer: Turn the computer back on and hit F2 very quickly repeatedly if the Windows XP menu starts up you didn’t hit F2 fast enough; turn the computer off and try again.

The Bios for the 1000HE.

The Bios for the 1000HE. This is basically the computer's unconscious. Spooky, huh?

Once the Bios menu has opened up do the following: Click the Right Arrow to select the Boot menu at the top of the screen: highlight “Boot Device Priority” and hit enter: make sure “Removable Dev.” is listed as the 1st Boot Device and that the Hitachi hard drive is listed as the second boot device; change the boot device order if Removable Dev. is not the first device.

Correct boot device priority.

Correct boot device priority. Now the 1000HE will try to boot from the usb drive before it tries the hard drive.

Hit Escape to go back: highlight “Boot Settings Configuration” and select enter: highlight “Quick Boot” and hit enter: set it to “disabled” and hit enter.

Disable the quick boot.  It's difficult to boot from usb if this is enabled.

Disable the quick boot. It's difficult to boot from usb if this is enabled.

Hit escape to go back to the previous menu: highlight “Boot Boster” and select “disabled” and hit enter.

Disable the boot booster.  The booster makes it difficult to boot from usb.

Disable the boot booster. The booster makes it difficult to boot from usb.

Then click the right arrow to go to the Exit menu at the top of the screen: highlight “Exit and Save Changes” and hit enter. The computer should restart and Windows will boot up.

Save new bios settings and exit.  That wasn't so scary.

Save new bios settings and exit. That wasn't so scary.

Next, we take a look at Eeebuntu.

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2 Comments »

  1. Great instructions. I’m looking to do almost exactly what you did, except I don;t want to change the partitions on my 1000HE. Is there a reason you changed the partitions from the two default that it came with? Or can I skip the repartitioning steps and just install eeebuntu on the D drive, and go? I’m mostly interested in having the dual boot option to see which I favor over time. Want to access files across the two OS, so is that a reason to redo the partitions for some reason? Thanks for the guidance in advance.

    Comment by Jason Rupe — July 21, 2009 @ 7:24 pm

    • Jason, You can leave the partition scheme the same. I only changed it because I only use Windows in emergency situations so I don’t need to have Windows occupying half of my hard drive space.

      Comment by spectralcat — July 21, 2009 @ 9:03 pm


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